Selective Hydrogenation of Sucrose into Sugar Alcohols over Supported Raney Nickel-Based Catalysts

https://doi.org/10.22146/ijc.31319

Rodiansono Rodiansono(1*), Maria Dewi Astuti(2), Dwi Rasy Mujiyanti(3), Uripto Trisno Santoso(4)

(1) Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Lambung Mangkurat University, Jl. A. Yani Km 35.8, Banjarbaru 70713, South Kalimantan, Indonesia
(2) Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Lambung Mangkurat University, Jl. A. Yani Km 35.8, Banjarbaru 70713, South Kalimantan, Indonesia
(3) Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Lambung Mangkurat University, Jl. A. Yani Km 35.8, Banjarbaru 70713, South Kalimantan, Indonesia
(4) Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Lambung Mangkurat University, Jl. A. Yani Km 35.8, Banjarbaru 70713, South Kalimantan, Indonesia
(*) Corresponding Author

Abstract


Selective hydrogenation of sugars (e.g. sucrose, cellobiose, glucose, fructose, xylose, arabinose) into sugar alcohols (sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, arabitol) can be achieved by means of supported Raney Ni-based catalysts. Various supporting materials such as the layered structure of clay (e.g. bentonite, taeniolite, smectite), metal oxides (e.g. Nb2O5, ZrO2, Al2O3), and conventional supports (e.g. carbon, silica, zeolite (JRC-SZ1)) were employed to obtain high performance of supported Raney Ni-based catalysts. The conventional Raney Ni, Raney Ni/AlOH, and Ni-NP with relatively high dispersion exhibited superior catalytic activity compared with the various supported Raney Ni catalysts with the conversion of 100% and hexitols selectivity almost ~99%. The H2 treatment of Raney Ni/SMT at a temperature of 473–773 K caused the increase in Ni(111) crystallite sizes as the conversion of sucrose with compromised decreased of hexitols product. The presence of acidic co-catalyst such as SnO, amberlyst-15, JRC-SZ1, JRC-Z5-9OH1 on Raney Ni/AlOH catalyst significantly enhanced the formation of glycerol product even though the conversion of sucrose compromised decreased owing to the partial leaching of Ni metal into the reaction mixture.


Keywords


selective hydrogenation; sugars; sugar alcohols; supported Raney Ni; acidic co-catalysts

Full Text:

Full Text PDF


References

[1] Dhepe, P.L., and Fukuoka, A., 2008, Cellulose conversion under heterogeneous catalysis, ChemSusChem, 1 (12), 969–975.

[2] Zhou, C.H., Xia, X., Lin, C.X., Tonga, D.S., and Beltramini, J., 2011, Catalytic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fine chemicals and fuels, Chem. Soc. Rev., 40 (11), 5588–5617.

[3] Fukuoka, A., and Dhepe, P.L., 2006, Catalytic conversion of cellulose into sugar alcohols, Angew. Chem., 118 (31), 5285–5287.

[4] Fukuoka, A., and Dhepe, P.L., 2006, Catalytic conversion of cellulose into sugar alcohols, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 45, 5161–5163.

[5] Luo, C., Wang, S., and Liu, H., 2007, Cellulose conversion into polyols catalyzed by reversibly formed acids and supported ruthenium clusters in hot water, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 46 (40), 7636–7639.

[6] Hoffer, B.W., Crezee, E., Mooijman, P.R.M., van Langeveld, A.D., Kapteijn, F., and Moulijn, J.A., 2003, Carbon supported Ru catalysts as promising alternative for Raney-type Ni in the selective hydrogenation of D-glucose, Catal. Today, 79-80, 35–41.

[7] Kusserow, B., Schimpf, S., and Claus, P., 2003, Hydrogenation of glucose to sorbitol over nickel and ruthenium catalysts, Adv. Synth. Catal., 345 (1-2), 289-299.

[8] Castoldi, M.C.M., Câmara, L.D.T., and Aranda, D.A.G., 2009, Kinetic modeling of sucrose hydrogenation in the production of sorbitol and mannitol with ruthenium and nickel-Raney catalysts, React. Kinet. Catal. Lett., 98 (1), 83–89.

[9] Makke, M., Kieboom, A.P.G., and van Bekkum, A., 1985, Hydrogenation of D-fructose and D-fructose/D-glucose mixtures, Carbohydr. Res., 138 (2), 225–236.

[10] van Gorp, K., Boerman, E., Cavenaghi, C.V., and Berben, P.H., 1999, Catalytic hydrogenation of fine chemicals: Sorbitol production, Catal. Today, 52 (2-3), 349–361.

[11] Hoffer, B.W., Crezee, E., Devred, F., Mooijman, P.R.M., Sloof, W.G., Kooyman, P.J., van Langeveld, A.D., Kapteijn, F., and Moulijn, J.A., 2003, The role of the active phase of Raney-type Ni catalysts in the selective hydrogenation of D-glucose to D-sorbitol, Appl. Catal., A, 253 (2), 437–452.

[12] Gallezot, P., Cerino, P.J., Blanc, B., Flèche, G., and Fuertes, P., 1994, Glucose hydrogenation on promoted Raney-nickel catalysts, J. Catal., 146 (1), 93–102.

[13] Petró, J., Bóta, A., László, K., Beyer, H., Kálmán, E., and Dódony, I., 2000, A new alumina-supported, not pyrophoric Raney-type Ni-catalyst, Appl. Catal., A, 190 (1-2), 73–86.

[14] Li, H., Wang, W., and Deng, J.F., 2000, Glucose hydrogenation to sorbitol over a skeletal Ni-P amorphous alloy catalyst (Raney Ni-P), J. Catal., 191 (1), 257–260.

[15] Li, H., Li, H., and Deng, J.F., 2002, Glucose hydrogenation over Ni–B/SiO2 amorphous alloy catalyst and the promoting effect of metal dopants, Catal. Today, 74 (1-2), 53–63.

[16] Rodiansono, R., and Shimazu, S., 2013, Effective production of sorbitol and mannitol from sugars catalyzed by Ni nanoparticles supported on aluminium hydroxide, Bull. Chem. React. Eng. Catal., 8 (1), 40–46.

[17] Rodiansono, R., Hara, T., and Shimazu, S., 2013, Total hydrogenation of biomass-derived furfural over Raney nickel-clay nanocomposite catalysts, Indones. J. Chem., 13 (2), 101–107.

[18] Lowell, S., Shields, J.E., Thomas, M.A., and Thommes, M., 2004, Characterization of Porous Solids and Powders: Surface Area, Pore Size And Density, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Netherlands, 101–128.

[19] Qi, X., Watanabe, M., Aida, T.M., and Smith, Jr., R.L., 2008, Catalytic conversion of fructose and glucose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in hot compressed water by microwave heating, Catal. Commun., 9 (13), 2244–2249.

[20] JCPDS-ICDD, 1991, Powder diffraction files, JCPDS-International Center for Diffraction Data (JCPDS-ICDD).

[21] Saxena, U., Dwivedi, N., and Vidyarthi, S.R., 2005, Effect of catalyst constituents on (Ni, Mo, and Cu)/Kieselguhr-catalyzed sucrose hydrogenolysis, Ind. Eng. Chem. Res., 44 (5), 1466–1473.



DOI: https://doi.org/10.22146/ijc.31319

Article Metrics

Abstract views : 704 | views : 457


Copyright (c) 2018 Indonesian Journal of Chemistry

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

 


Indonesian Journal of Chemisty (ISSN 1411-9420 / 2460-1578) - Chemistry Department, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia.

Web
Analytics View The Statistics of Indones. J. Chem.