Lessons from the Mass Production of Wolbachia-infected Aedes aegypti for Egg Release in the Sleman and Bantul Districts of Yogyakarta

https://doi.org/10.22146/jtbb.84753

Iva Fitriana(1), Indah Nurhayati(2), Budi Arianto(3), Defriana Lutfi Chusnaifah(4), Indira Diah Utami(5), Nabhela Ayu Purwaningrum(6), Utari Saraswati(7), Endah Supriyati(8), Adi Utarini(9), Riris Andono Ahmad(10), Citra Indriani(11), Eggi Arguni(12*), Warsito Tantowijoyo(13)

(1) World Mosquito Program Yogyakarta, Centre for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281
(2) World Mosquito Program Yogyakarta, Centre for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281
(3) World Mosquito Program Yogyakarta, Centre for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281
(4) World Mosquito Program Yogyakarta, Centre for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281
(5) World Mosquito Program Yogyakarta, Centre for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281
(6) World Mosquito Program Yogyakarta, Centre for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281
(7) World Mosquito Program Yogyakarta, Centre for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281
(8) World Mosquito Program Yogyakarta, Centre for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281
(9) World Mosquito Program Yogyakarta, Centre for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281; Department of Health Policy and Management, Faculty of Medicine Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281
(10) World Mosquito Program Yogyakarta, Centre for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281
(11) World Mosquito Program Yogyakarta, Centre for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281; Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Population Health, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281
(12) World Mosquito Program Yogyakarta, Centre for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281; Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
(13) World Mosquito Program Yogyakarta, Centre for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281
(*) Corresponding Author

Abstract


An efficacy study on wMel Wolbachia-infected Aedes aegypti technology conducted by the World Mosquito Program (WMP) Yogyakarta showed the reducing of dengue incidence in Yogyakarta City. Following this successful result, the intervention was scaled up into two neighbouring districts: Sleman and Bantul. This paper describes our experience in mass production for providing release material for a larger area to reach the deployment target, which includes insectary requirements, mass production protocols, and diagnostic screening. This review may serve as a reference guidance for national mass production for wMel Wolbachia-infected Ae. aegypti

 


Keywords


mass production; production protocol Aedes aegypti; wMel Wolbachia

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.22146/jtbb.84753

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