STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT IN A PHARMACOTHERAPY PRACTICE COURSE: A CASE STUDY AT AN INDONESIAN PHARMACY SCHOOL

https://doi.org/10.22146/jpki.54653

Lailaturrahmi Lailaturrahmi(1*), Elsa Badriyya(2)

(1) Bagian Farmakologi dan Farmasi Klinik, Fakultas Farmasi, Universitas Andalas, Padang – INDONESIA
(2) Bagian Farmakologi dan Farmasi Klinik, Fakultas Farmasi, Universitas Andalas, Padang – INDONESIA
(*) Corresponding Author

Abstract


Background: Indonesian pharmacy schools are expected to meet required clinical pharmacy components and the proportion of practical courses according to nationally established standards. This is essential to produce competent Indonesian pharmacists. The implementation of Pharmacotherapy of Gastrointestinal, Respiratory Tract Diseases, and Special Conditions Practice was one of the measures taken to meet this requirement. This case study aims to explore obstacles in Pharmacotherapy of Gastrointestinal, Respiratory Tract Diseases, and Special Conditions Practice.

Case discussion: Pharmacotherapy of Gastrointestinal, Respiratory Tract Diseases, and Special Conditions (FAF 314) Practice was conducted using group case study with SOAP (subjective, objective, assessment, plan) worksheet. During the sixth week of practice, a modified OSCE was conducted to assess the learning process. The skills that were assessed included problem identification, problem-solving, drug information service, effective communication, as well as attitude and professionalism. However, the students’ average score in this assessment was about 1-2 of maximum score 3, and the required passing score was 2.

Conclusion: The sub-optimal students’ achievement in the mid-term assessment of Pharmacotherapy of Gastrointestinal, Respiratory Tract Diseases, and Special Conditions Practice may be due to the students’ obstacles in understanding the information from literature and showing effective communication skills and professional attitude in drug information provision. To address these issues, further measures such as constructive alignment analysis of this practice, revising practice activities design and allocating adequate time to practice effective communication skills and professional attitude in drug information provision.

 

Keywords: constructive alignment, communication, pharmacotherapy practice, OSCE, SOAP


Keywords


constructive alignment, communication, pharmacotherapy practice, OSCE, SOAP

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.22146/jpki.54653

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