THE MENTAL HEALTH OF FIRST- AND FINAL-YEAR PRECLINICAL MEDICAL STUDENTS

https://doi.org/10.22146/jpki.52417

Michelle Stephanie(1*), Charles Surjadi(2)

(1) Fakultas Kedokteran dan Ilmu Kesehatan, Universitas Katolik Indonesia Atma Jaya Jakarta, Jakarta – INDONESIA
(2) Fakultas Kedokteran dan Ilmu Kesehatan, Universitas Katolik Indonesia Atma Jaya Jakarta, Jakarta – INDONESIA
(*) Corresponding Author

Abstract


Background: Medical students consistently have higher rates of mental health problems, these include higher levels of stress, anxiety, and burnout, alongside low levels of overall health, and energy. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and the factors influencing the mental health of first- and final-year preclinical students in Unika Atma Jaya.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on all first-year preclinical students (196 respondents) and all final-year preclinical students (115 respondents) using Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ). Data were then analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, chi square, and Fisher’s exact test.

Results: 95 out of 196 (48.5%) of first-year students and 22 out of 115 (19.1%) of final-year students have SRQ score of ³6. Mental health of first-year students were found to be related to their religion and personal life events. Meanwhile factors affecting the mental health of final-year students were their motivation in enrolling to medical school and personal life events.

Conclusion: There is a significant difference of mental health in first- and final-year students (48.5% and 19.1%). This may be related to their religion, personal life events, and their motivation in enrolling to medical school.

 

Keywords: mental health, medical students, self reporting questionnaire

 


Keywords


mental health, medical students, self reporting questionnaire

Full Text:

PDF


References

1. Metrics GH. Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 333 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 195 countries and territories, 1990–2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. 2017;390:1990–2016.

2. Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 Results [Internet]. Seattle; 2017. Available from: http://ghdx.healthdata.org/gbd-results-tool

3. Metrics GH. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 328 diseases and injuries for 195 countries, 1990–2016 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. 2017;390:1990–2016.

4. World Health Organization. Depression and Other Common Mental Disorders: Global Health Etimates. Geneva; 2017.

5. Kementrian Kesehatan Republik Indonesia. Hasil Utama Laporan Riskesdas 2018. 2018;

6. Kementrian Kesehatan Republik Indonesia. Riset Kesehatan Dasar. Jakarta; 2013.

7. Auerbach RP, Bruffaerts R, Mortier P, Alonso J. The WHO World Mental Health Surveys International College Student Project- Prevalence and Distribution of Mental Disorders. J Abnorm Psychol. 2018;

8. Brazeau CMLR, Shanafelt T, Durning SJ, Massie FS, Eacker A, Moutier C, et al. Distress Among Matriculating Medical Students Relative to the General Population. Acad Med. 2014;89(11).

9. Ohtsu T, Kaneita Y, Osaki Y, Kokaze A, Ochiai H, Shirasawa T, et al. Mental health status among Japanese medical students: A cross-sectional survey of 20 universities. Acta Med Okayama. 2014;68(6):331–7.

10. Hersi L, Tesfay K, Gesesew H, Krahl W, Ereg D, Tesfaye M. Mental distress and associated factors among undergraduate students at the University of Hargeisa, Somaliland: A cross-sectional study. Int J Ment Health Syst. 2017;11(1):1–8.

11. Al Saadi T, Zaher Addeen S, Turk T, Abbas F, Alkhatib M. Psychological distress among medical students in conflicts: A cross-sectional study from Syria. BMC Med Educ. 2017;17(1):1–8.

12. Tawfik DS, Profit J, Morgenthaler TI, Satele D V, Sinsky CA, Dyrbye LN, et al. Physician Burnout, Well-being, and Work Unit Safety Grades in Relationship to Reported Medical Errors. Mayo Clin Proc. 2018 Aug 23;

13. Brazeau CMLR, Schroeder R, Rovi S, Boyd L. Relationships Between Medical Student Burnout, Empathy, and Professionalism Climate. Acad Med. 2010;85(10).

14. Dyrbye LN, Thomas MR, Shanafelt TD. Medical student distress: Causes, consequences, and proposed solutions. Mayo Clin Proc. 2005;80(12):1613–22.

15. Farrer LM, Gulliver A, Bennett K, Fassnacht DB, Griffiths KM. Demographic and psychosocial predictors of major depression and generalised anxiety disorder in Australian university students. BMC Psychiatry. 2016;16(1):1–9.

16. Aldiabat KM, Matani NA, Le Navenec C-L. Mental Health among Undergraduate University Students: A Background Paper for Administrators, Educators and Healthcare Providers. Univers J Public Heal. 2014;2(8):209–14.

17. Qamar K, Rizwan M, Kiani B, Ayyub A, Khan AA, Osama M. Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions Higher stress scores for female medical students measured by the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10) in Pakistan. J Educ Eval Heal Prof. 2014;11:10–1.

18. Orom H, Semalulu T, Iii WU. The Social and Learning Environments Experienced by Underrepresented Minority Medical Students : A Narrative Review. 2013;88(11):1765–77.

19. Omigbodun OO, Odukogbe A-TA, Omigbodun AO, Yusuf OB, Bella TT, Olayemi O. Stressors and psychological symptoms in students of medicine and allied health professions in Nigeria. 2006;415–21.

20. Moir F. Empowering Medical Students to Improve Their Mental Health. The University of Auckland; 2013.

21. Pacheco JP, Giacomin HT, Tam WW, Ribeiro TB, Arab C, Bezerra IM, et al. Mental health problems among medical students in Brazil: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Rev Bras Psiquiatr. 2017;(0):369–78.

22. Ngasa SN, Sama C, Dzekem BS, Nforchu KN, Tindong M, Aroke D, et al. Prevalence and factors associated with depression among medical students in Cameroon : a cross-sectional study. 2017;1–8.

23. Dunn LB, Iglewicz A, Moutier C. Promoting Resilience and Preventing Burnout. 2008;(February).

24. Slavin SJ, Schindler DL, Chibnall JT. Medical student mental health 3.0: Improving student wellness through curricular changes. Acad Med. 2014;89(4):573–7.



DOI: https://doi.org/10.22146/jpki.52417

Article Metrics

Abstract views : 2047 | views : 1860

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.


Copyright (c) 2020 Michelle Stephanie, Charles Surjadi

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Jurnal Pendidikan Kedokteran Indonesia (The Indonesian Journal of Medical Education) indexed by: